KETAMINE FAQ’S



  • What is Ketamine?
  • How Does Ketamine Alleviate Depression?
  • Is Ketamine Safe?
  • Why is Ketamine Not Used More Commonly?
  • What are Ketamine Infusions Like?
  • What are the Side Effects of Ketamine Infusions?
  • Is Ketamine a Scheduled Substance?
  • Can Insurance Pay for My Ketamine Infusions?
  • Is ECT or Ketamine the Right Treatment for Me?
What is Ketamine?

Ketamine is a derivative of phencyclidine. It is an anesthetic drug that was first developed in 1962. Ketamine has a history of being used in general anesthesia for more than 30 years and is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. Ketamine is FDA-approved as an anesthetic and has an incredibly safe track record in clinical settings. Ketamine is also commonly used to treat nerve related pain in Emergency Rooms and Outpatient Centers. 

Most recently, researchers have consistently found that low doses of ketamine infusions produce a rapid anti-depressant effect, leading to excitement for it being new treatment option for mental health disorders. 

How Does Ketamine Alleviate Depression?

Ongoing research is still figuring out the many ways in which Ketamine affects the brain, but scientists agree that by blocking the NMDA receptors, ketamine prompts the brain to increase the production of synaptic signaling proteins, Glutamate, in the prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex is known to have a crucial role in a person’s ability to regulate their mood. 

FMRI brain scans have shown Ketamine also promotes the growth of new synapses in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in greater connectivity in the brain, while also switching certain connections on and off. This combination of events is thought to be the main reason for the rapid anti-depressant effect. 

Is Ketamine Safe?

Ketamine was first used as anesthetic in the Vietnam war. Since then, it has been widely used in medical procedures across the world. It is currently used by approximately 80% of anesthesiologists in their practice. Our FNP PMHNP Nora Finnegan can personally attest that in the 1000+ ketamine infusions she has performed, that she has never encountered a serious medical issue. 

 Unlike other psychiatric medications it typically has no lasting side effects 24 hours past the treatment and usually only produces a drowsiness and fatigue for a short period of time. While Ketamine has shown to occasionally cause bladder issues for chronic users, it is typically from higher doses than what New Pathways offers. 

Why is Ketamine Not Used More Commonly?

Despite Ketamine’s effectiveness in treating mental health conditions, it is not an FDA approved treatment. Largely because it was developed as an anesthetic. Like many medical discoveries, its effectiveness in treating mental health was stumbled upon just as it was for treating certain pain conditions. In the 1970’s it was discovered that patients with chronic pain, reported it completely disappearing after surgeries where ketamine was used.  

As ketamine began to be a commonly used in for pain, reports of it eliminating depression also occurred. The scientific literature over the past 15 years is just starting to fully show the promise of Ketamine as a mental health treatment. As a generic drug that has outlived its patent, there is no financial incentive for pharmaceutical companies to pay tens of millions of dollars to fund an FDA approved trial. 

What are Ketamine Infusions Like?

Ketamine infusions are a medical procedure provided by medical professionals. They are administered intravenously (IV), over the course of 45-60 minutes in a controlled and comfortable manner. Most patients report a relaxing experience during the treatment.

Please see our Patient Experience and Patient FAQ’s pages for more information

What are the Side Effects of Ketamine Infusions?

Research and Nora Finnegan’s personal experience of performing over a thousand ketamine infusions have found that common short-term side effects are tiredness, confusion, dizziness and nausea that last no longer than the day of treatment. Less commonly patients can experience headaches, anxiety, and prolonged dissociative state beyond the treatment. 

Is Ketamine a Scheduled Substance?

Yes, Ketamine is listed a schedule III substance from the DEA.  “Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence” (DEA) It also means that is use without prescription from a medical professional is illegal. 

Can Insurance Pay for My Ketamine Infusions?

With Nora Finnegan’s extensive history in dealing with insurance companies for Ketamine infusions, we will always do our best to maximize your insurances coverage of the treatments. All you have to do is provide your health insurance card and our software will do the rest! Based on her experience, we know most patients will have a majority of the costs covered. 

Insurance coverage  varies from patient to patient even if they have the same health insurance company. Because Ketamine is not an FDA approved treatment for mental health and pain conditions, we cannot guarantee that you will be covered 100%.  

As an independently operated clinic, please understand that we require upfront payment for Co-pays, Co-insurance, Deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs. HSA/FSA Cards, Credit Cards, Debit Cards, Money Orders, or patient financing with Advanced Care are all acceptable forms of payment.  

See our Insurance and Payments Page for more details.

Is ECT or Ketamine the Right Treatment for Me?

When many physicians or patients hear about or experience treatment-resistant disorders, they consider resorting to Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT). 

More recently, patients and clinicians are realizing that ketamine infusions are a less invasive and cheaper alternative for treatment-resistant conditions. Additionally, Ketamine infusions have been found to be effective in 60% of patients for whom ECT was not effective! 

Following weeks of ECT treatments under general anesthesia, patients are often placed on one to several specific antidepressant medications and can experience lapses in memory and cognition. Ketamine infusions offers a simpler treatment with less side effects and should always be considered as an option prior to undergoing ECT. 



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Our mission at New Pathways Clinic is to create a holistic mental wellness campus for the greater Cleveland region, combining cutting-edge treatments like Ketamine infusions and Spravato with health professionals specialized in providing accompanying therapy and lifestyle education. We strive to grow and adapt as the scientific body of research continues to expand and diversify for innovative mental health treatments that will lead Cleveland into a healthier future.